Creating a business plan cover page

How to write your business plan cover page

When you think of putting together your business plan, the business plan cover page may not be the first thing that comes to mind. Although it’s traditionally one of the last sections you create in a business plan, it’s one of the most important.

When potential investors or banks read a business plan, their first impression is the cover page—but don’t overthink it. A business plan cover page is meant to be simple and straightforward, with some important contact information and more importantly, your logo.

Use this breakdown to find out what the purpose of your cover page is, which elements you need to include, and how to structure it to maximize your impact.

What is the purpose of a cover page?

Your cover page exists to communicate what the enclosed document is and to provide the necessary information for a reader to contact you about the business. The appearance and quality of a cover page will set the tone for your business plan’s content.

Even though you need to make a great impression on your business plan cover page, keep it concise.

“Simple, clean and powerful are the three goals of a strong business plan cover,” suggests experts at business consulting firm Growthink.

Don’t clutter your cover page with details about how your business will operate—save those important details for the executive summary. A successful business plan cover page focuses only on the introductory basics.

What should you include on a business plan cover page?

The cover page is meant to be brief, and should only include a few basic details like your contact information and a little about the business plan itself.

To keep it simple, your business plan cover page should include:

  • Your company logo
  • Document title and business name
  • Business address and contact information
  • Business plan completion date
  • Confidentiality statement

How should you format a business plan cover page?

Once you know what information belongs in this section, all that remains now is to organize it. And if you need some further guidance, these downloadable templates can streamline the process of drafting a cover page—and the rest of your business plan, too.      

  • Company logo: Add a high-resolution thumbnail of your logo at the top center of the cover page. This will help establish a brand identity and allow readers to connect visually to the business right from the start.
  • Title: Give the logo some space and then center the words “Business Plan” in a large, bold font. You can also frame the title as “Three–” or “Five–Year Business Plan,” if you intend to make those kinds of financial projections in the document.
  • Business name: Beneath the title, write your company name, also centered in a bold font. This should be the most noticeable and prominent feature on the page, so choose a large typeface.
  • Address and contact information: Under the company name, include the business’ physical address and website if you have one. Provide the details necessary for interested parties to contact you, such as a phone or fax number and email address. It’s also helpful to include your name as the business owner and the names of any partners or executive officers so that potential investors know where to direct their inquiries.  
  • Date of completion: Below the contact information, write the month and year in which this business plan was finalized and issued.
  • Confidentiality Statement: At the bottom of the page, include a sentence to the effect of: “This document contains confidential and proprietary information created by [business name]. This document is issued exclusively for informational purposes and should not be reproduced without the consent of [business name].” Adding this confidentiality statement offers a protective measure against the disclosure of your business idea, according to this cover page guide.

Business plan cover page examples

To further illustrate the structure and format of a business plan cover page, we’ve compiled a few cover page examples real companies have used.

The first example is from NASA. While this cover page is technically for a grant application, the same basic rules apply when it comes to the content that needs to be included and formatting.

The next cover page example is from Reaction Technology. It’s simple and gets straight to the point. At a glance, the reader knows this is a five-year business plan covering operations from 2007-2011 and that the purpose is to set out a plan to expand their services.

The next cover page example is for a brand new business, and you can immediately glean that crucial information.

Keep your business plan cover page simple

As you prepare to draft your business plan, remember to keep your cover page simple and concise. With your logo, business name, and contact information, you’ll introduce the reader into your business plan quickly and easily—and set yourself up for success as a result.

Jessica Thiefels
By Jessica Thiefels
Categories:   Running a business
Disclaimer

The information and tips shared on this blog are meant to be used as learning and personal development tools as you launch, run and grow your business. While a good place to start, these articles should not take the place of personalized advice from professionals. As our lawyers would say: “All content on Wave’s blog is intended for informational purposes only. It should not be considered legal or financial advice.” Additionally, Wave is the legal copyright holder of all materials on the blog, and others cannot re-use or publish it without our written consent.